Five Cwriting workshop 

Creating Clear, Compelling, Cogent, and Concise Essays

This workshop will provide students with the fundamental skills needed to write effectively. It is available for individuals and small groups, and will help students with their homework assignments, college essays, research papers, and SAT/ACT prep.

 

For more information, please contact me here

 

Following is the specific curriculum of the six-part course.

Session 1:

The importance of reading and following the directions carefully. Select a fun topic to write about. The week's assignment is to write a 1.5 page paper on the student's chosen topic, that incorporates the customized directions.

Session 2:

Review assignments from class 1. Learn how to write a cogent, compelling thesis, along with an outline and opening paragraph. Discuss the importance of a strong thesis and organized outline.  Rewrite paper in light of session topic and learnings.

Session 3: 

Review assignment from class 2.  Learn about note-taking for research and for class lectures. Find primary and secondary source material for chosen topic. Expand 1.5 page paper to three pages. Continued discussion and application of what students have learned to writing assignment.

Session 4: 

Review assignment from class 3. Learn about editing, revising, and how to give up that one sentence or paragraph you absolutely LOVE but need to cut. Write 3 page rough draft incorporating all workshop learning to date. 

Session 5: 

Submit first draft and review. Learn how to provide constructive feedback. Learn what makes feedback constructive.  Continue to revise three page paper, using what has been learned thus far.

Session 6: 

Final three-page paper and presentation.

In each session we will address important critical thinking skills that correspond with effective, cogent, clear, compelling, and persuasive writing.  For example:

  • The distinction between assumptions/opinion and fact.  

  • The difference between inferences and implications.

  • Building a sequential argument or persuasive statement.

  • Synthesizing ideas.  

  • Writing for an audience who is unfamiliar with your topic.  

  • What it means to "analyze" vs "evaluate" or "discuss", etc.  

  • Perspective-taking.  

  • How to compare and contrast.

We will also address the emotional and psychological elements that come with writing, including the fear of putting our thoughts on paper, and of committing to an idea or argument.  We will discover the sense of exhilaration that comes with saying what we want to say the way we want to say it, and knowing that someone gets it, clearly and concisely!

 

This workshop will prepare students for the cogent writing needed for homework assignments, research papers, SAT/ACT, and college essays.  
The workshop also will be helpful for students who choose to transition from Honors or Accelerated to AP.

 

Along with learning academic writing and analysis, students will develop more confidence in their ideas and themselves. They'll improve their communication skills, learn how to provide constructive feedback, and learn how to contribute to a discussion so others want to listen and everyone learns.

 

I will break down the elements of writing into manageable lessons, and assign students to write about something they are genuinely interested in. This will make the lessons fun and not overwhelming. Learning these step- by-step procedures will help students feel engaged and will show them that they have something real and valuable to offer.  They'll experience the sense of generativity that accomplishment can provide, and they will want to do more.  

ENHANCED STUDENT SKILLS

CRITICAL THINKING

Analysis

Idea synthesis

Perspective taking

Comparisons

ACADEMIC WRITING

Homework assignments

Research papers

SAT/ACT prep

College essays


 

CONFIDENCE BUILDING

Communication skills

Constructive feedback

Engaging lessons​

Pride in accomplishment

Tutoring provided for students 14 years and older in- person and via Skype or Zoom.

© 2020 by JOAN'S LEARNING SUPPORT. Created by Stephanie Gerber Wilson, PhD.